Chris Snape - Tech Blog and Stuff
Only Coin.
This looks like a really cool way to avoid having to carry around all your cards. Plus it can be tagged to your phone so if the two of them drift too far apart the phone tells you, so you never leave it behind. It reads your card via an app and a reader that plugs in, it then adds it to the ‘Coin’ card and mimics the card. But you can’t see the info on the Coin itself, so you can’t read it off via a photo, which is cool.
However, it’s kind of pointless for us in the UK who have adopted Chip&Pin. As far as I can see it does not support that, only the old style swipe through. So…. Is this a missed trick?

Only Coin.

This looks like a really cool way to avoid having to carry around all your cards. Plus it can be tagged to your phone so if the two of them drift too far apart the phone tells you, so you never leave it behind. It reads your card via an app and a reader that plugs in, it then adds it to the ‘Coin’ card and mimics the card. But you can’t see the info on the Coin itself, so you can’t read it off via a photo, which is cool.

However, it’s kind of pointless for us in the UK who have adopted Chip&Pin. As far as I can see it does not support that, only the old style swipe through. So…. Is this a missed trick?

The Future of Windows in a ‘Diverse Device’ Environment

After reading Tim Anderson’s (@timanderson) article, What will it take to save Windows from becoming a workhorse legacy operating system? it got me thinking - what exactly do I want to do with regards to Windows7 and Windows8?

Looking at how we utilise devices at work, at home and on the road surely there needs to be more user control in it’s latest Operating system offering? The number of people who have spoken about their frustration with the Metro Modern UI interface and the auto-switching to the traditional desktop and back again etc.

If Microsoft wants to break into the Tablet market (and change it) then I think that the ‘Modern UI’ is a step in the right direction, and the common aesthetics it shares with Window Phone 8 are good. However, have people on non-touch laptops or desktop PCs been left with a experience that feels disjointed and difficult to use?

As an IT Admin I love the idea of bringing all types of devices under a common OS and I can see advantages at home too, in households that utilise a few mix of laptops, PCs and tablets. But why not allow the user the control of their UI? Why not develop apps to run in both environments? The ex Windows 7 user using the traditional desktop, on their upgraded PC or non-touch laptop - but also enjoying the touch UI on a tablet (Or a new touch laptop with detachable keyboard?).

You could, effectively, make two distinct experiences out of one OS licence, rather than a mash-up of two platforms that can’t decide who is the master of the other. With full control over the desktop you could enjoy your experience far better.

Imagine the bliss of a Windows Phone 8 connected to the same network (or Domain - Active Directory Phones!) as your laptop using the traditional desktop and the tablet using the Modern UI. All sharing the same data, either locally or through the cloud. Just give us the choice to control it and keep the user happy. After all, if you can pull two types of user into the same OS sales figures - surely that would look favorably?

Microsoft needs to remember it’s grass roots and the business that relies on the tried and tested desktop environments, as well as the mobile user and the modern home consumer. Surely you can keep us all happy? Surely THAT is the key to success?

Any thoughts or comments gladly accepted.

Regards,

Chris Snape

 

Incredible time lapse video of Space from the International Space Station

This is one of the best things I have ever seen on the Internet. This will involve two minutes of you watching, without making any sound, and being blown away.

bitshare:

It’s been a while since I posted a really good time lapse video, but this one may take the cake. It’s a video compiled of photos taken from the International Space Station. I don’t know exactly how many photos were used, but must be thousands. Space is such a beautiful sight to see.

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Kids, the Internet and a Parent’s Challenge

Being a parent these days is challenge enough - But my oldest is now six years old and going to an extra curricular ICT club at her school. This is all well and good, getting acquainted with common peripherals (Touch screen, mouse etc.) is good preparation for the future. By then utilising this kind of equipment will be even more common place than it is now.
However, it does raise a slightly more worrying subject of Internet safety and the big wide world at your fingertips. I have heard news reports of cyber-bullying and the horrors of whether the person you are talking too is actually who they claim to be etc. Naturally, as a parent, I am a little apprehensive of what lies ahead for my children when they are old enough to surf the web on their own.
A very broad generalisation would be that each successive generation uses technology more than the previous - that being said how can parents teach their kids this stuff themselves?
I consider myself to be pretty savvy on the web, it’s part and parcel of my job as an IT bod, but will I still be able to lockdown/protect/restrict my children’s many online gadgets from potential issues online? Who knows? Only time will tell - the current gadgets we use today will be ‘old hat’ by the time my oldest ventures online.
Something that would make me rest easier at night was knowing that my children have been taught this kind of stuff in the classroom - in a similar way that youngsters (including myself back in the day) are taught about ‘Stranger Danger’ in the physical world. I think a structured part of the school curriculum should be a class or two on Internet safety and good practices of the do’s and dont’s when online.
With the current criticisms about the content of secondary school ICT classes why not bring more about security to the forefront, to prepare them for the Internet and the pitfalls associated with it. Or not even class it as ICT, but general preparation for adult life?
Would be interest on any thoughts on this.
Regards,
Chris Snape

Kids, the Internet and a Parent’s Challenge

Being a parent these days is challenge enough - But my oldest is now six years old and going to an extra curricular ICT club at her school. This is all well and good, getting acquainted with common peripherals (Touch screen, mouse etc.) is good preparation for the future. By then utilising this kind of equipment will be even more common place than it is now.

However, it does raise a slightly more worrying subject of Internet safety and the big wide world at your fingertips. I have heard news reports of cyber-bullying and the horrors of whether the person you are talking too is actually who they claim to be etc. Naturally, as a parent, I am a little apprehensive of what lies ahead for my children when they are old enough to surf the web on their own.

A very broad generalisation would be that each successive generation uses technology more than the previous - that being said how can parents teach their kids this stuff themselves?

I consider myself to be pretty savvy on the web, it’s part and parcel of my job as an IT bod, but will I still be able to lockdown/protect/restrict my children’s many online gadgets from potential issues online? Who knows? Only time will tell - the current gadgets we use today will be ‘old hat’ by the time my oldest ventures online.

Something that would make me rest easier at night was knowing that my children have been taught this kind of stuff in the classroom - in a similar way that youngsters (including myself back in the day) are taught about ‘Stranger Danger’ in the physical world. I think a structured part of the school curriculum should be a class or two on Internet safety and good practices of the do’s and dont’s when online.

With the current criticisms about the content of secondary school ICT classes why not bring more about security to the forefront, to prepare them for the Internet and the pitfalls associated with it. Or not even class it as ICT, but general preparation for adult life?

Would be interest on any thoughts on this.

Regards,

Chris Snape

Comparison of Bandwidth Table

This is a good quick look at the comparison of bandwidth between current technologies. Useful if you are thinking about external storage.

Comparison of Bandwidth Table

This is a good quick look at the comparison of bandwidth between current technologies. Useful if you are thinking about external storage.